The Brooklyn Navy Yard Collection (BNYC)    Critic:  Martin Finio    The brief called for the design of an art gallery and artists’ studios on a disused pier in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The project began with an examination of current trends in contemporary art, focusing in particular on the fact that much contemporary art is produced for a global market. The processes of production and consumption of art are therefore entirely divorced, and this project seeks to question this dislocation and reintroduce the question of specificity in art.  The building houses artists whose work is displayed in galleries directly adjacent to their studios, so that the spaces of production and display are combined, creating new curatorial opportunities for the resident artists.  The organisation of the building draws on the Navy Yard’s long history as a space of production. The traditional empty atrium at the core of most contemporary galleries is replaced with a core that is filled with spaces for the production of art.  The building contributes to the changing role of the navy yard in a mutually beneficial relationship, where the Navy Yard brand can help artists gain recognition, while the display of their work will draw visitors and potential customers to the navy yard.  The galleries and studios are housed in a cube, a monumental form that can be seen from Manhattan, and takes its place among the numerous objects scattered along the Brooklyn waterfront. Punched openings in the cube allow for light to penetrate into the galleries and studios and provide a space for public display of artworks. 
       
     
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  The Brooklyn Navy Yard Collection (BNYC)    Critic:  Martin Finio    The brief called for the design of an art gallery and artists’ studios on a disused pier in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The project began with an examination of current trends in contemporary art, focusing in particular on the fact that much contemporary art is produced for a global market. The processes of production and consumption of art are therefore entirely divorced, and this project seeks to question this dislocation and reintroduce the question of specificity in art.  The building houses artists whose work is displayed in galleries directly adjacent to their studios, so that the spaces of production and display are combined, creating new curatorial opportunities for the resident artists.  The organisation of the building draws on the Navy Yard’s long history as a space of production. The traditional empty atrium at the core of most contemporary galleries is replaced with a core that is filled with spaces for the production of art.  The building contributes to the changing role of the navy yard in a mutually beneficial relationship, where the Navy Yard brand can help artists gain recognition, while the display of their work will draw visitors and potential customers to the navy yard.  The galleries and studios are housed in a cube, a monumental form that can be seen from Manhattan, and takes its place among the numerous objects scattered along the Brooklyn waterfront. Punched openings in the cube allow for light to penetrate into the galleries and studios and provide a space for public display of artworks. 
       
     

The Brooklyn Navy Yard Collection (BNYC)

Critic: Martin Finio

The brief called for the design of an art gallery and artists’ studios on a disused pier in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The project began with an examination of current trends in contemporary art, focusing in particular on the fact that much contemporary art is produced for a global market. The processes of production and consumption of art are therefore entirely divorced, and this project seeks to question this dislocation and reintroduce the question of specificity in art.

The building houses artists whose work is displayed in galleries directly adjacent to their studios, so that the spaces of production and display are combined, creating new curatorial opportunities for the resident artists.

The organisation of the building draws on the Navy Yard’s long history as a space of production. The traditional empty atrium at the core of most contemporary galleries is replaced with a core that is filled with spaces for the production of art.

The building contributes to the changing role of the navy yard in a mutually beneficial relationship, where the Navy Yard brand can help artists gain recognition, while the display of their work will draw visitors and potential customers to the navy yard.

The galleries and studios are housed in a cube, a monumental form that can be seen from Manhattan, and takes its place among the numerous objects scattered along the Brooklyn waterfront. Punched openings in the cube allow for light to penetrate into the galleries and studios and provide a space for public display of artworks. 

int render.jpg
       
     
big model close up.jpg
       
     
big model rear.jpg
       
     
Sections [Converted]-2.jpg
       
     
section1.jpg
       
     
galleryincontext2_edited.jpg
       
     
scaffold top_1.jpg
       
     
brown model edited.jpg
       
     
gallerycubedrawing.jpg
       
     
galleryperspective.jpg
       
     
gallery section early.jpg
       
     
LobbyLevel.jpg
       
     
gfloorplan.jpg
       
     
paintinglevel.jpg
       
     
Education Level.jpg
       
     
Office level.jpg
       
     
sculpture level.jpg